----> (New) Facebook Comments..."Cause all the cool kids are doin' it!"

87 responses

  1. "
    Troy – Cube.Dweller.Fitness
    March 18, 2011

    Maybe I’m more of a hardgainer, but I’ve worked several different rep patterns. This post matches my experience that working to fatigue matters most; often that means working in different rep patterns.

    I’ve done so many different types of programs: low-rep, German volume training with 10 sets of 10, 100 rep workouts, tabata drills, and more.

    The variation every 4-6 weeks pushes the body. I guess P90 followers would call it muscle confusion. The principle matters and this post nailed it — work to failure.

  2. "
    Craig
    March 19, 2011

    So an individual who went from 100lbs X 5 in the dumbbell bench press, to 150lbs X 5, while avoiding training to failure would not have bigger chest muscles? That does not make one iota of sense.
    As to your GF or any other individual, would not gross cal intake have a far greater bearing on whether or not additional bulk was put on. Not to mention how much cardio was employed over that time. Too, assuming she is natural, muscle building for women is definitely no easy task.
    Anyone with any time in the trenches knows from their own trial and error that they will respond to some rep brackets and not others, and that this may very well change over time. So reps don’t matter? Bollocks.
    Finally, for a drug free individual training to failure exacts a hell of toll on recovery. So much of failure training is from hyped shrunken testicled juice abusers. For those of who don’t go down that road though? If you can save your reserves and avoid going to failure, but progress your strength to some pretty bloody impressive levels by using the rep ranges you respond to, you are going to be big and strong. But that kind of commonsense doesn’t sell mags or supps.

  3. "
    shane
    March 23, 2011

    took the words right out of my mouth. I was thinking, if you do heavy loads, do negatives after failure or take some weight off and do as many reps as possible immediately. You may get full muscle recruitment and any unproven benefits of heavy weight training?

  4. "
    Louber
    March 28, 2011

    Hi Rusty,
    First time commenter. I had Dr R. Carpinelli during the ACSM Health and Fitness Instructor cert (which I pass) Very interesting and informative. Saw him years later and he had gone from 10 reps to 20 super slow reps. Tried it and it was not easy; very intense. Not many clients continued with it, but had mixed results with those that did. One positive; shorter workouts and thus longer rest time.

  5. "
    Tatianna
    June 15, 2011

    This is a very interesting concept. I always believed that reps didn’t matter at all, and now this article confirms my beliefs. I really love reading fitnessblackbook, I found more information here than I did studying for my Personal Trainer Certification.

  6. "
    Nicholas
    August 5, 2011

    Thanks for putting this together. It’s very interesting and it makes a lot of sense to me that exhausting the muscle, whether with a heavy or lighter weight is going to increase strength. I prefer to lift fast, but the results of the study are saying that tempo isn’t really important, just the resulting force that the muscle had to exert?

  7. "
    hello nfl
    October 5, 2011

    Thanks for putting this together. It’s very interesting and it makes a lot of sense to me that exhausting the muscle, whether with a heavy or lighter weight is going to increase strength. I prefer to lift fast, but the results of the study are saying that tempo isn’t really important, just the resulting force that the muscle had to exert?

  8. "
    Exercise On Abs
    November 8, 2011

    I was a hardgainer, but exercising in 45-60 sec interval got me the best results. For example : 12 reps x 4 seconds = 48 sec
    you can do 10 reps x 5 sec= 50 sec
    Nice post!

  9. "
    David @ The Natural Health Service
    January 3, 2012

    I like your video, and agree that the study is too narrow to have much meaning really.

    I do know for certain that you will not increase in strength (beyond the beginner stage) doing sets of 12 reps, but you will doing sets of 3 reps.

    If you use short rest periods with low reps and cause fatigue at the same time you will also gain size. Of course the weights you are using will have to be a bit lower for this than if you were taking longer rest periods.

    Training with max weight to failure with low reps will soon overtax the central nervous system and stop gains. And even with higher reps only your last couple of sets should be max effort.

  10. "
    John Oxnard
    April 28, 2012

    I recently watched the documentary “Pumping Iron” which is about Arnold Schwarzenegger and body building. I remember Arnold saying that “the last few reps are the ones that build muscle”. Being able to squeeze out those last few reps will be the reason you build muscle. So as long as you are pushing yourself to your limit either method is fine.

  11. "
    Rocky
    May 1, 2012

    I have been using this technique for about 2 months. I am currently in a juvenile prison facility that does not let us use weights but I have been using this method with body weight. I have noticed increased strength but I still have maintained my lean build. Also I have proven, using the maximum effort technique I can increase in size using strictly body weight, something that all of the inmates deny.

  12. "
    J
    January 10, 2013

    Studies, studies, studies. everyone is doing studies and coming up with different answers and all contradicting themselves. its a joke going on the internet trying to find what to do and what not to do.

  13. "
    Logan Bates
    March 26, 2013

    Interesting study!! I’ve always felt more repetitions gives me a better workout (simply using bodyweight techniques) but then again I don’t really fancy myself a body builder, I prefer to have an athletic build! I guess it just depends on your own personal goals!

  14. Load More Comments…

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

Back to top
mobile desktop